Articles for July 2016

Smoking may have negative effects on sperm quality

Smoking may have negative results on sperm quality

A recent study found that sperm of men who smoke has a greater degree of DNA damage than that of non-smokers. Scientists also evaluated 422 proteins in individuals’ sperm. One protein was missing, 27 proteins were underrepresented, and 6 proteins were over-represented in cigarette smokers. Analyses of these proteins suggest that cigarette smoking may promote an inflammatory response in the male reproductive tract. The BJU International research study consisted of 20 nonsmoking guys and 20 males who smoked. “A growing number of research studies are showing a damaging effect of smoking cigarettes on male fertility. Our outcomes point in the instructions of crucial semen alterations: semen of cigarette smokers presents an inflammatory nature, associated with decreased capacity of sperm to accomplish fertilization and create a healthy pregnancy,” said Dr. Ricardo Pimenta Bertolla, senior author of the research study. “It is particularly significant that, in our study, sperm DNA fragmentation was increased. Other studies have proposed this to be a potentially promutagenic effect, which is to state that sperm with altered DNA may cause illness in the offspring.” Article: Analysis of the functional elements and influential plasma proteomic profile of …
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“> See all stories on this topic Stopping apoptotic reaction might maintain fertility in females getting cancer treatments Female cancer patients of reproductive age might maintain their fertility during radiation and chemotherapy through treatments that target the DNA damage response in oocytes (the cells that develop into eggs), a technique that operates in animal models. Jackson Laboratory Assistant Teacher Ewelina Bolcun-Filas, Ph.D., and Terri L. Woodward, M.D., assistant professor at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, explain the approach in “Prolonging Reproductive Life after Cancer: The Need for Fertoprotective Treatments,” an opinion post in Cell Press Trends in Cancer. “The good news is that more girls are surviving cancer,” Bolcun-Filas states, “showing the arrival of much better and more reliable treatments. But, lots of cancer treatments increase the danger of early ovarian deficiency (POI) and infertility.” And while assisted reproductive innovations can deal with infertility, she states, they fail to protect ovaries’ natural function, which has a crucial function in ladies’s health that goes beyond reproduction. Many cancer treatments cause DNA damage, not just in cancer cells but likewise typical tissue such as in ovaries. The natural reaction to this damage is believed to be …
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Twin abnormality danger might be greater among mums

not on fertility treatment This page was printed from: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/311112.php See www.medicalnewstoday.com for medical news and health news headlines posted throughout the day, every day. © & copy; 2004-2016 All rights reserved. MNT is the signed up trade mark of MediLexicon International Limited. For complete functionality, it is required to allow JavaScript. Here are directions the best ways to allow JavaScript in your web browser. We utilize cookies to customize your surfing experience. By visiting our website, you accept their usage. Learn more. The risk of abnormality among twins might be higher amongst mums who haven’t used fertility treatment – which is understood to increase the possibilities of a twin birth – than among those who have used it, finds US research published online in the Journal of Public health & Community Health. The rate of twin births in the US rose by 75% in between 1980 and 2011, and it is believed that fertility treatment might help describe this boost. But it is unclear whether fertility treatment might itself be linked to the higher rate of abnormality seen among twins, as previous studies have not always included information on its use. In an effort to clarify the associ …
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Infertility risk posed by endometriosis may be half of previous estimation: majority of women with endometriosis do not experience infertility

Infertility danger posed by endometriosis may be half of previous estimate: majority of ladies with endometriosis do not experience infertility

About 5 to 10 percent of the basic female population is affected with endometriosis, and a higher prevalence is found among females with infertility. Although endometriosis is commonly observed in women who are infertile, it is unknown when endometriosis is the cause of infertility or an incidental discovery throughout the infertility evaluation. “Although women with endometriosis are at higher danger for infertility compared with ladies without endometriosis, our research study recommends that most of women with endometriosis do not experience infertility and the majority do become pregnant and have the ability to develop the families that they desire.” stated senior research study author Stacey A. Missmer, Sc.D, director of Epidemiologic Research study in Reproductive Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In this new study, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Health center collected information from 58,427 women who are individuals of the Nurses’ Health Study-2 to analyze the relationship in between endometriosis and infertility. Researchers discovered a greater danger of subsequent infertility in ladies with endometriosis, but only amongst women under age 35. According to the study’s potential analysis, the infertility danger posed by …
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“> See all stories on this topic World report on fertility treatments reveals high use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection( ICSI)The editor-in-chief of one of the world’s leading reproductive medication journals has attacked the rising usage of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) for the treatment of infertility, following publication of the latest world report on assisted reproductive technologies (ART) today (Saturday). The report in Human Reproduction reveals that while ICSI use has levelled off in some areas, its use is approaching 100% of assisted reproduction cycles in the Middle East and a few countries in other areas, regardless of the reality that ICSI was developed for the treatment of male infertility, which is a factor in around 40% of couples looking for fertility treatment 1. The world report covers the years 2008, 2009 and 2010 – the years for which the most recent information are readily available. In an editorial entitled “Santa Claus in the fertility center”, to accompany the world report by the International Committee for Keeping an eye on Helped Reproductive Technologies (ICMART), Professor Hans Evers highlights that in 2010 there were 220,000 in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatments, but there were more than 455,000 ICSI treatments in the world. There was 1.4 times as much ICSI than IVF in Asia, two times as much …
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“> See all stories on this subject Counseling standards required for pediatric yous receiving fertility, sexual function treatment

The drugs and therapies utilized to treat medical conditions frequently come with side effects. Doctors, pharmacists and other health care experts aim to be sure we are made aware. But when the you is under age, and the effects consist of perhaps long-term effect on the capability to have biological children and/or sexual function, who should be told – the you, the parent or both? And who should interact these details? In a commentary published online in the journal Pediatrics, researchers from 2 prominent children’s health centers and a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center call for the creation of a panel of experts to develop communication standards for pediatric companies to utilize with young clients dealing with these issues. The paper, titled “A Call for Fertility and Sexual Function Therapy in Pediatrics,” was co-authored by Leena Nahata, M.D., pediatric endocrinologist and medical director of the Fertility and Reproductive Health Program at Nationwide Children’s Medical facility; Gwendolyn Quinn, Ph.D., senior member of the Health Outcomes and Habits Program at Moffitt Cancer Center; and Amy Tishelman, Ph.D., senior staff psychologist and Director of Cl …
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Chlamydia: World's first vaccine in sight

Chlamydia: World’s very first vaccine in sight

Study co-author David Bulir, of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research study at McMaster University in Canada, and colleagues report their findings in the journal Vaccine. Chlamydia is among the most common sexually transferred infections in the United States, with around 2.86 million infections happening every year. Chlamydia is generally transmitted through having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with a contaminated individual. There are 4 species of germs that can cause infection – the most typical of which is C. trachomatis. Nevertheless, the infection frequently provides no signs, and many individuals do not look for testing. As a result, many people with chlamydia are unaware they have it, so the infection frequently goes unattended. Neglected chlamydia can have serious health effects, particularly for women. It might result in pelvic inflammatory disease, and it can trigger irreparable damage to the reproductive system, resulting in long-term pelvic pain, infertility, or ectopic pregnancy. At present, the only methods to lower the risk of chlamydia are to use a condom during sexual relations or to prevent sexual contact completely. Now, Bulir and associates think they are well o.
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Marin doctor sentenced to 3 years in prison in federal painkiller case

Marin medical professional sentenced to 3 years in prison in federal painkiller case A suspended Marin County physician was sentenced Tuesday to 3 years in prison for illegally dispersing prescription painkillers, the Department of Justice announced. Michael Roger Chiarottino, who specialized in pain and dependency treatment, was indicted in 2014 on 15 counts of dispersing illegal drugs, including oxycodone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, hydromorphone and methadone, federal district attorneys stated. The indictment covered the period from February 2013 to March 2014. Chiarottino, a 68-year-old San Rafael local, pleaded guilty in March. He admitted to recommending large amounts of painkillers at North Bay Pain Management Services in San Rafael to federal drug representatives impersonating yous, the prosecution stated. He likewise cannot look for an adequate case history to support the big quantities he prescribed. Chiarottino prescribed enough oxycodone for 1,530 30-milligram pills, according to the United States Lawyer’s Office for Northern California. Chiarottino was sentenced by U.S. District Court Jeffrey White in Oakland. The prosecution sought a sentence of 6 years and 6 months. “Offender sold prescriptions for money while thumbing his nose at the people and the o.
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“> Will Testosterone Rev You Up or Stall You Out? Testosterone replacement treatment may not be the eternal youth for aging males. A large government-funded research study published in the New England Journal of Medication in February reports that testosterone, touted for its ability to jump-start libido, did little to enhance a male’s abilities in the bed room. “The trial showed modest advantages in sex and functions,” says study scientist Shalender Bhasin, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Healthcare facility in Boston. But those sexual benefits may not last, the year-long study concluded. By the end, they had actually begun to taper off. “And enhancements in other locations were less clear,” Bhasin says. Guy with “low T”– testosterone below 275 nanograms per deciliter of blood– frequently feel down or depressed, and the study revealed that testosterone therapy did offer a small lift to their state of mind. But it had little impact on their energy or levels of exercise. These results get to a time when the number of males going through testosterone treatment is on the increase. Between 2009 and 2013, prescriptions almost doubled, from 1.3 million to 2.3 million. The FDA has approved it to deal with medical conditions that impact testosterone production, such …
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“> See all stories on this subject Opioid Abusers Missing Out on Anti-Addiction Drug By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Press reporter WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News)– Medical professionals aren’t using one of the most reliable weapons at their disposal in battling dependency to prescription painkillers– the anti-addiction drug Suboxone, a new study discovers. An evaluation of Medicare insurance claims revealed that U.S. physicians are woefully underprescribing Suboxone. The drug is the only treatment Medicare covers to deal with opioid addiction. “For every single 40 family medicine physicians who recommended an opioid painkiller, only one recommended Suboxone,” stated lead author Dr. Anna Lembke. She’s chief of the Stanford Addiction Medication Double Medical diagnosis Center at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. “There’s lots and lots of recommending opioids for discomfort, but hardly any prescribing of this particular drug to treat opioid dependency,” she included. There’s an epidemic of prescription painkiller abuse in the United States. In 2014, prescription drugs added to nearly 29,000 overdose deaths from pain relievers or heroin, more than any year on record, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Medicare clients have among the fastest growing and highest rates of opioid abuse in the United State …
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“> See all stories on this subject What’s Prowling in Your Beach’s Water? Get information and examines on prescription drugs, non-prescription medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition. Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our tablet identification tool will show pictures that you can compare to your pill. Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA signals, produce family profiles and more. Speak with health professionals and other people like you in WebMD’s Neighborhoods. It’s a safe forum where you can produce or take part in support groups and discussions about health subjects that interest you. July 14, 2016– Brian Parrott cannot watch news reports about what occurred to him. He can still hardly think it. Parrott, a 50-year-old security guard, went to a Galveston, TX, beach with his kid and grandchildren on a current Sunday afternoon. He went to work as normal on Monday, but by Tuesday, he was running a fever and his ideal leg had actually turned red. On Wednesday, his leg was covered in oozing blisters. On Thursday, when he finally went to the emergency room, doctors told him he might lose his leg or his life. Parrott was infected with an uncommon but aggressive bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus …
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“> See all stories on this subject Raimondo signs education costs on dyslexia, recess and bi-literacy PROVIDENCE, R.I.– Suzanne Arena has spent practically nine years looking for the ideal treatment for her boy, Cole, who has dyslexia. So she was tearful when Gov. Raimondo signed an expense into law on Wednesday that will train teachers how to deal with …
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IVF treatment not associated with increased risk of breast cancer

IVF treatment not connected with increased risk of bust cancer Amongst females undergoing fertility treatment in the Netherlands between 1980 and 1995, using in vitro fertilization (IVF) compared to non-IVF treatment was not connected with increased danger of breast cancer after a mean follow-up of 21 years, according to a research study appearing in JAMA. For years, breast cancer has been the most common malignancy amongst ladies worldwide. Both exogenous and endogenous estrogens and progestogens have been revealed to affect breast cancer risk. Since IVF procedures briefly cause decreased estradiol and progesterone levels, as well as strongly elevated hormonal agent levels, IVF may influence bust cancer danger. Due to the fact that of the high occurrence of bust cancer and the large numbers of ladies undergoing ovarian stimulation for IVF, even a small threat increase would have important public health ramifications. Previous studies of breast cancer threat after IVF treatment were inconclusive due to minimal follow-up. Alexandra W. van den Belt-Dusebout, Ph.D., of the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, and coworkers examined long-term threat of bust cancer after ovarian stimulation for IVF amongst 19,158 women who began IVF treatment between 1983 and 1995(IVF … See all stories on this topic

Women on osteoporosis treatment should have repeat DXA screenings to assess response to treatment

Females on osteoporosis treatment need to have repeat DXA screenings to examine response to treatment

For complete functionality, it is needed to make it possible for JavaScript. Here are instructions the best ways to allow JavaScript in your web internet browser. We utilize cookies to personalize your browsing experience. By visiting our website, you accept their usage. Learn more. Treatment-related changes in bone mineral density (BMD) are associated with fracture threat and reduces in BMD throughout treatment are not unusual. As such, women taking osteoporosis treatment must have their BMD monitored to determine if their treatment is working. The findings are released in Record of Internal Medication. Osteoporosis, a typical reason for fracture, is generally detected based a finding of low bone mineral density (BMD) from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Evaluating with DXA is suggested for ladies aged 65 years or older and in younger ladies at increased danger for fracture, but there is no agreement on the function of repeated BMD testing after initial examination. The practice of repeated BMD testing throughout pharmacotherapy also remains questionable. Group-level medical trial information recommend that greater increases in BMD are associated with greater fracture danger decrease, but this may be harder to display in clinic …
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