Is life expectancy changing?

Life-expectancy (average lifespan) of women in England andWales in 1900 was 50.1years. It follows that more than half the female population never reached their menopause. By 1950, life-expectancy had risen to 71.1years and in 1990 it reached 79.2 years. This 60% increase in life-expectancy through the twentieth century is typical throughout the industrialised countries. These life-expectancy figures are calculated from birth. A woman currently aged 60 has a life expectancy of a further 22.6 years (Figure 26.1). Nowadays, most women are destined to spend more than a third of their lives beyond the menopause. We now have 10 million postmenopausal women in theUnited Kingdom .

A recent television advertisement promoting pensions made the following observation. “In 1954, the queen sent her congratulations to 300 people on reaching the age of one hundred. Last year there were three thousand and by the year 2034 there will be many thousands". To quote our national anthem, “Long live the Queen".

The following table shows the improved life expectancy in the USA:

All races White Black or African American1



Specified age and year Both sexes Male Female Both sexes Male Female Both sexes Male Female

At birth Remaining life expectancy in years
19002,3 47.3 46.3 48.3 47.6 46.6 48.7 33.0 32.5 33.5
19503 68.2 65.6 71.1 69.1 66.5 72.2 60.8 59.1 62.9
19603 69.7 66.6 73.1 70.6 67.4 74.1 63.6 61.1 66.3
1970 70.8 67.1 74.7 71.7 68.0 75.6 64.1 60.0 68.3
1980 73.7 70.0 77.4 74.4 70.7 78.1 68.1 63.8 72.5
1990 75.4 71.8 78.8 76.1 72.7 79.4 69.1 64.5 73.6
1995 75.8 72.5 78.9 76.5 73.4 79.6 69.6 65.2 73.9
1996 76.1 73.1 79.1 76.8 73.9 79.7 70.2 66.1 74.2
1997 76.5 73.6 79.4 77.1 74.3 79.9 71.1 67.2 74.7
1998 76.7 73.8 79.5 77.3 74.5 80.0 71.3 67.6 74.8
1999 76.7 73.9 79.4 77.3 74.6 79.9 71.4 67.8 74.7
2000 77.0 74.3 79.7 77.6 74.9 80.1 71.9 68.3 75.2
2001 77.2 74.4 79.8 77.7 75.0 80.2 72.2 68.6 75.5
2002 77.3 74.5 79.9 77.7 75.1 80.3 72.3 68.8 75.6
2003 77.5 74.8 80.1 78.0 75.3 80.5 72.7 69.0 76.1
At 65 years
19503 13.9 12.8 15.0 - - - 12.8 15.1 13.9 12.9 14.9
19603 14.3 12.8 15.8 14.4 12.9 15.9 13.9 12.7 15.1
1970 15.2 13.1 17.0 15.2 13.1 17.1 14.2 12.5 15.7
1980 16.4 14.1 18.3 16.5 14.2 18.4 15.1 13.0 16.8
1990 17.2 15.1 18.9 17.3 15.2 19.1 15.4 13.2 17.2
1995 17.4 15.6 18.9 17.6 15.7 19.1 15.6 13.6 17.1
1996 17.5 15.7 19.0 17.6 15.8 19.1 15.8 13.9 17.2
1997 17.7 15.9 19.2 17.8 16.0 19.3 16.1 14.2 17.6
1998 17.8 16.0 19.2 17.8 16.1 19.3 16.1 14.3 17.4
1999 17.7 16.1 19.1 17.8 16.1 19.2 16.0 14.3 17.3
2000 18.0 16.2 19.3 18.0 16.3 19.4 16.2 14.2 17.7
2001 18.1 16.4 19.4 18.2 16.5 19.5 16.4 14.4 17.9
2002 18.2 16.6 19.5 18.2 16.6 19.5 16.6 14.6 18.0
2003 18.4 16.8 19.8 18.5 16.9 19.8 17.0 14.9 18.5
At 75 years
1980 10.4 8.8 11.5 10.4 8.8 11.5 9.7 8.3 10.7
1990 10.9 9.4 12.0 11.0 9.4 12.0 10.2 8.6 11.2
1995 11.0 9.7 11.9 11.1 9.7 12.0 10.2 8.8 11.1
1996 11.1 9.8 12.0 11.1 9.8 12.0 10.3 9.0 11.2
1997 11.2 9.9 12.1 11.2 9.9 12.1 10.7 9.3 11.5
1998 11.3 10.0 12.2 11.3 10.0 12.2 10.5 9.2 11.3
1999 11.2 10.0 12.1 11.2 10.0 12.1 10.4 9.2 11.1
2000 11.4 10.1 12.3 11.4 10.1 12.3 10.7 9.2 11.6
2001 11.5 10.2 12.4 11.5 10.2 12.3 10.8 9.3 11.7
2002 11.5 10.3 12.4 11.5 10.3 12.3 10.9 9.5 11.7
2003 11.8 10.5 12.6 11.7 10.5 12.6 11.4 9.8 12.4

(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.rid=healthus05. Table.375)

Related Medical Abstracts - Click on the paper title:-

Life expectancy at birth has risen in all industrialized countries during the last 100 years, but mortality improvements by gender and region often have proceeded at very different rates. Although some countries have experienced increases in overall mortality during recent decades, the levels of life expectancy gains in countries such as Japan have confounded demographic predictions and have led to renewed research and debate over future mortality decline and the limits to human life. This paper reviews levels of and changes in life expectancy at birth and at older ages in industrialized countries during the 20th century. Trends in mortality and morbidity at older ages are summarized in the context of the historic epidemiological disease transition from infectious to chronic. Cause-specific and active/inactive decompositions of life expectancy are examined, as are initial attempts to correlate life expectancy with physical attributes that may reflect differential nutritional status.





Please click on the required question.

Women's Health

Thank you for choosing to visit us.


This is the personal website of David A Viniker MD FRCOG, retired Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist - Specialist Interests - Reproductive Medicine including Infertility, PCOS, PMS, Menopause and HRT.
I do hope that you find the answers to your women's health questions in the patient information and medical advice provided.

I do hope that you find the answers to your women's health questions in the patient information and medical advice provided.

Life Expectancy

The aim of this web site is to provide a general guide and it is not intended as a substitute for a consultation with an appropriate specialist in respect of individual care and treatment.

David Viniker retired from active clinical practice in 2012.
In 1999, he setup this website - www.2womenshealth.com - to provide detailed
information many of his patients requested. The website attracts thousands of visitors every day from around the world.
If you would like advice on how to make more from your website, please visit his website Keyword SEO PRO or email him on david@page1-on-google.com.

David Viniker Linkedin Profile