DNA-Based Vaccine Guards Against Zika in Monkey Study

DNA-Based Vaccine Guards Versus Zika in Monkey Research study

Get information and examines on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition. Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill recognition tool will display photos that you can compare to your tablet. Conserve your medication, check interactions, sign up for FDA signals, develop family profiles and more. Talk to health specialists and other people like you in WebMD’s Neighborhoods. It’s a safe forum where you can produce or participate in support system and discussions about health subjects that intrigue you. THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News)– A speculative DNA-based vaccine secured monkeys from infection with the birth defects-causing Zika infection, and it has proceeded to human safety trials, scientists report. “The vaccine generally generated antibodies from all primates, but for the animals that got a complete dose of vaccine, 17 of 18 were protected from infection,” said research study co-author Ted Pierson. He is chief of the Viral Pathogenesis Section at the United States National Institute of Allergy and Transmittable Diseases. Based on these findings, scientists have begun clinical safety trials in hea …
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Some Have Impractical Wish for Cancer Trials Get information and evaluates on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition. Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill recognition tool will show pictures that you can compare with your pill. Save your medicine, check interactions, register for FDA alerts, produce family profiles and more. Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD’s Communities. It’s a safe online forum where you can develop or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you. MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News)– Numerous cancer patients hold impractical hopes when they choose to sign up with early phase clinical trials of speculative treatments, brand-new research shows. These trials– called stage 1 trials– evaluate the safety and possible advantages of treatments that have never before been evaluated on people. Many of these trials are restricted to patients who have advanced illness or who have not reacted to other treatments. Usually, clients begin a trial on a low dose of medication and gradually get bigger dosages until a suggested level is set for a new phase 2 trial. Af …
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CDC Ends Zika Travel Advisory for Miami Community Read expert point of views on popular health topics. Get info and reviews on prescription drugs, over the counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition. Go into the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare with your pill. Save your medication, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, produce family profiles and more. Speak to health experts and other people like you in WebMD’s Neighborhoods. It’s a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and conversations about health subjects that intrigue you. MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News)– U.S. health officials on Monday lifted the Zika infection travel advisory that advised pregnant ladies to avoid travel to Miami’s Wynwood area. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to ask pregnant females and their partners to take preventative measures to prevent mosquito bites if they take a trip to or live in Wynwood. An arts district north of downtown Miami, Wynwood became the first location in the continental United States with mosquito transmissions of the infection that can trigger dreadful birth defec …
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“> See all stories on this topic Why the Teen Years Might Not Be Lean Years Adolescents burn about 450 less calories daily than 10-year-olds, research study discovers WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News)– A new study suggests that kids’s metabolism briefly slows during the age of puberty– a pattern that might assist explain the existing teen weight problems problem. The research study found that kids’ resting energy expenditure typically dropped during puberty. That describes the number of calories the body burns at rest. Usually, the scientists discovered, 15-year-olds utilized about 450 fewer calories at rest each day, compared to when they were 10 years old. The shift is unexpected, professionals stated, since bigger bodies usually burn more calories at rest– to sustain brain activity, the cardiovascular system and the other physical processes that keep us alive. “Body mass is the greatest predictor of resting energy expense. So a fall in the age of puberty, when development is fast, is unanticipated,” stated lead scientist Dr. Terence Wilkin, a teacher of endocrinology and metabolism at the University of Exeter in England. The factors for the pattern aren’t clear, but Wilkin speculated on an explanation: The body might have progressed to conserve calories during the crucial duration of adolescence, to assist …
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Do Open Floor Plans Invite Overeating? Less calories are consumed in closed kitchen spaces, research study states THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News)– Open-concept home are all the rage right now, but new research study suggests that such easy access to the kitchen area may result in overeating. “Open kitchen-dining area floor plans get rid of visual and physical barriers between human beings and food,” said study co-author Kim Rollings, an assistant professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame. “Our outcomes recommend that individuals may eat more in a dining location with direct view of and access to the serving area, versus a different dining space,” Rollings said. In the study, Rollings and her collaborator Nancy Wells, an ecological psychologist from Cornell University, observed the eating habits of 57 college students. The students finished two dining sessions at Cornell’s Food and Brand Lab, where they were served buffet-style meals. For one meal, the students had a direct view of and access to the food serving area (the open planning). For the other meal, 2 wooden folding screens were placed in between the dining table and cooking area (the closed strategy). In the closed-plan setup, students might still walk through to …
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