'We need to be out here': Thousands march in downtown L.A. to support science in the Trump era

‘We need to be out here’: Thousands march in downtown L.A. to support science in the Trump era

Worn long sleeves and a sensible safari hat, Dr. Diane Brown brought a sign that read, “My clients require science because lupus is not cured, juvenile arthritis is not cured … CANCER is not treated!” Brown, a rheumatologist at Children’s Healthcare facility Los Angeles, said she hadn’t went to any marches since President Trump took office at the start of the year. But on Saturday afternoon she signed up with countless others in downtown Los Angeles for the March for Science Los Angeles. The 52-year-old physician said her sign had a special significance for her. Two of her patients were identified with cancer recently. One was 8 years old. The other was simply 4. “I have a PhD, I did my time in the laboratory and I know how difficult it is to get the information for each line in a released research study,” she said. “That takes hours, months or years, and if we do not money it, people will leave labs, and they may never ever return.” The March for Science Los Angeles was one of 600 marches that took place on Earth Day 2017 to “defend the vital function science plays in our health, security, economies, and federal governments,” in the words of the organizers. The main event took place on the National Shopping mall in …

See all stories on this topic Author and poet Tourettes bringing his own design of teaching to the capital Dyslexia never ever stopped Dominic Hoey from producing, and now Wellingtonians will have the possibility to learn from the effective author, poet and artist. Hoey will bring his distinct brand of teaching to the Toi Poneke Arts Centre for his special two-day writing course Discover how to Write Excellent, across the weekend of May 27. The course will take aspiring authors through the principles of the craft, assisting them discover their voice. Coping with dyslexia, Hoey didn’t discover how to compose up until he was 8, which he believes has offered his mentor an unique viewpoint. LEARNT MORE: * The survey: Tourettes * Singer/songwriter Will Wood and poet Tourettes explore New Zealand * Us Two: Dominic Hoey and Todd Williams “Due to the fact that it took so long to find out the essentials, it has enabled me to clearly identify the issues,” he says. “With [dyslexia] you learn how to see things differently.” His course started after he invested years informally teaching composing structure to those around him. Since then he has run six Discover how to Read Good courses in Auckland. “It has been fantastic. The waiting list has been so long,” he states. “I’m actually passionate about it and it reveals that anybody can be a great writer.” The course has …

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