Gynecol Endocrinol. 2003 Feb;17(1):13-8.

Use of complementary therapies by women attending a

specialist premenstrual syndrome clinic.

Domoney CL ,Vashisht A,StuJW.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK. In this study, we investigate the use of complementary therapies by women attending a specialist premenstrual syndrome (PMS) clinic in the UK. Data was collected via an anonymous questionnaire survey of 100 women attending the clinic. Results showed 91% of women had used at least one form of complementary therapy for the management of their premenstrual symptomatology although only 35% were current users. Over half (53%) felt that these therapies had been of some benefit. Prescribed medication for PMS was being used by 71% of women at the time of the questionnaire and 83% of these women were satisfied with the perceived success of conventional therapy. In conclusion, the vast majority of women attending a specialist PMS clinic in the UK have used complementary therapies to treat this chronic debilitating condition but few continue use long-term. Treatment may be instigated by the woman with advice from her informal support network and/or her physicians. However as use is so prevalent, but with few randomized controlled trials conducted to show their benefits or risks, it is important to improve awareness of these therapies, both in Qualitative and quantitative terms. Satisfaction with prescribed medications did not appear to be influenced by complementary therapy use in this group of women.

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This is the personal website of David A Viniker MD FRCOG, retired Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist - Specialist Interests - Reproductive Medicine including Infertility, PCOS, PMS, Menopause and HRT.
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